Monday, March 29, 2010

Missouri


Captain's chair on bridge of Battleship USS Missouri.

Missouri docked at her permanent home in Pearl Harbor, Oahu. On her decks the instrument of surrender was signed ending World War 2.

An unforgettable view from the bridge windows towards the USS Arizona Memorial. To protect against bombs and torpedoes, Missouri is armoured in steel plate more than 30centimetres thick in places.

The 16-inch gun turrets. Missouri and other Iowa-Class battleships carried 9 such giant rifles. They could each fire a 2700-pound shell 40 kilometres! Due to Earth's curvature a battleship can only fire as far as it can see, leaving the advantage to aeroplanes. For centuries ships with cannon dominated naval warfare.

Isaac Newton saw warships armed with cannon. He saw that the faster a cannonball is fired, the farther it travels. Newton deduced that a projectile moving fast enough would "fall" around the Earth's curve, becoming a satellite. The farther a satellite orbits from Earth, the slower its velocity. Newton surmised that the Moon's orbit followed the same law of gravitation.

If Newton were alive today he would see that particles of light (photons) appear to travel at the same velocity. He would also see evidence that Space/Time began at a tiny point, called a "Big Bang." As the Universe gets older, every point in Space/Time travels farther from that initial singularity.

Perhaps Newton would deduce that gravitation affects all particles, even those of light. Just as satellites circle the Earth, he might surmise that photons are locked in orbit around a "Big Bang." As light particles move farther in Space/Time from the Big Bang, their velocity must also slow.

GM=tc^3. Where G is Newton's gravitational constant, M and t are mass and age of the Universe. As time t increases, speed of light c is predicted to slow. Newton's laws continue to guide our spacecraft to the planets. The power of ideas lasts longer and travels much farther than a battleship's guns.

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3 Comments:

Blogger nige said...

Thanks for the photos of Pearl Harbor! I've been fascinated by it since reading Herman Kahn's analysis of the way that Japan had to design special torpedoes to be used in the shallow water there to sink the Pacific fleet at the outbreak of the war. It's amazing that such a highly protected base proved vulnerable to a surprise attack. You look beautiful as always!

10:54 AM  
Blogger L. Riofrio said...

Thanks nige, your picture is nice too.

5:20 PM  
Blogger Norman Copeland said...

Perhaps you could consider the new type propellers that reduced noice on submarines.

It will help you with the concept of the outdated e=mc squared theory.

Norman Copeland.

www.spacetravel21stcentury.blogspot.com/

6:55 PM  

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