Tuesday, October 30, 2007

A Hole in the Rings


In the past year this blog has reported many discoveries about Saturn. A mysterious "hot spot" on Enceladus' South Pole resupplies the E Ring. Prometheus' interactions with F Ring include a mysterious stream of materiel connecting them. The B Ring is filled with tightly bound clumps of particles. Saturn's poles contain aurorae, a polar storm and enigmatic hexagon. There is far more here than meets the eye.

In the October 25 issue of NATURE, scientists report discovery of more "propellor" features. These are huge wakes, 10-20 km long, formed by unseen objects orbiting within the Rings. The objects are invisibly orbiting at a distance of about 130,000 km, occupying a band 3200 km wide. They have been interpreted as stadium-sized rocks, but the mass is also just right for tiny Black Holes. Space.com reports this as "More Strange Holes Found in Saturn's Rings."

Moons like Enceladus and Prometheus exist inside the "Roche Limit." It was once thought that this marked a demarcation line within which moons would be torn apart. Prometheus has one of the lowest densities of a solar system object, just 0.47 g/cm^3. That is less than 1/2 the density of liquid water. It is very odd that objects with less density than liquid should exist inside the Roche Limit, within which liquid objects are not supposed to exist.

H.G Wells' Invisible Man was finally discovered by tracks he left in snow. Saturn's Rings are literally a field of ice in which the tracks of invisible objects can be seen. If our Solar System contains tiny Black Holes, this is a good place to look. If these small moons contained singularities, it would explain how they formed and stay together. The Rings show conditions similiar to our Solar System's formation. Singularities may be the key to how Earth and the planets were created.

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6 Comments:

Blogger Kea said...

At space.com they say, The discovery of more oddly shaped gaps in Saturn's rings strengthens the case that one of the planet's moons was smashed to bits in an ancient collision. Oh, well. What can one expect? Great post!

4:47 PM  
Blogger L. Riofrio said...

It is funny how these half-baked interpretations get out of control and spread. This is how "dark energy" got started. Thanks for the supportive comment on asymptotia, even if it was hacked.

5:37 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

If there were point singularities in the rings, shouldn't there be some sort of characteristic emissions, at least infrequently? Gamma ray bursts or something?

9:03 AM  
Blogger Kea said...

You mean like a mysterious brightening comet?

9:10 AM  
Anonymous dc said...

TBHs and GM=tc^3 simply fascinating as fit to observational phenomena. Keep'em coming. Btw, what might disqualify collision creating gap?

10:04 AM  
Blogger L. Riofrio said...

Check out the Saturn photo from last June. No, not the picture in front of Chiang Kai Shek's memorial, the Chandra photo at the bottom. The Rings are full of X-ray sources! These could also indicate gamma rays.

2:36 PM  

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